Tag Archive: people


A History Project

So here recently I have started on a project that involves history, namely the Great Northern Railroad and it’s history. I forget how it got started, but something was said about Willmar, MN and I looked at it on Google maps. Well I found a sizeable yard. Then from there I followed the tracts east to Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN then followed the tracks west as far as Fargo, ND.

Well I have begun collecting photos of a place called Breckenridge, MN which is west of Willmar. I have cound a couple of USGS maps for Willmar, MN and I have for a senority list for the Willmar Division from the ’20’s if memory serves me correctly. I have asked a lot of people for information and so far the responce is great, and thats how I was giev a few photos. But as one gentleman said it, “you need to settle one one place, find out what you can, then move on” so thats what I am going to do. I have settled on Willmar, MN and I plan on finding out what I can about the railroad and the town and collect as much data before I move on to the next segment.

So, if anyone wishes to jump aboard and help out, I am open to anyone who wishes to do this as a personal project, not for some book or monetary gain to help out. You can email me at mountainrain897@yahoo.com and we can talk about this. Otherwise, its just gonna be a fun long term hobby project that I will work on.

Happy Trails,

Charles

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Michigan Wolves

From Wolfwatcher on facebook this morning,

So, how do states keep track of wolves? Michigan’s Department of Natural Resources pilot, Neil Harri, takes Lansing State Journal reporters up in the sky for a unique wolf tracking experience. You can watch it via the link at: http://www. lansingstatejournal.com/videonetwork/1497327787001/Rise-of-the-gray-wolf Wolfwatcher’s Great Lakes Director has been a strong voice for wolves in the region, and she spoke out (again) to Lansing State reporters: QUOTE: “A poorly managed hunt could have a cascade effect on the wolf population and result in more animals dying than just those taken in a harvest, said Nancy Warren, Great Lakes regional director for the National Wolfwatcher Coalition and a member of the wolf roundtable that drafted the management plan. …

For example, she said, if a hunter took a male wolf who has pups in the den, the pups could either starve to death or force the female wolf to seek the easiest sources of food —livestock. The female wolf could then be taken by a farmer with a permit. Over time, those kinds of ripple effects could once again threaten the entire wolf population, she said. “There is no scientific evidence or research to support the need for a recreational hunting season,” Warren said. “The DNR already has many tools to manage conflicts. We allow lethal control by wildlife services, when nonlethal are ineffective. Livestock producers get compensation for verified losses. Landowner permits allow landowners to kill wolves if they have suffered depredation. It’s only been nine months. Let’s give the plan time to work.” (end quote)

[RESOURCE: http://www. lansingstatejournal.com/article/20121018/MICHIGANDER/310180028/On-hunt-Michigan-wolf-population-solutions? odyssey=tab

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Want to help? You can support Nancy’s efforts and that of others who are working hard to stop proposed wolf-hunting legislation by signing and sharing this petition which tells the Michigan legislature and governor that you agree with us! Our collective voice is being heard…let’s keep on howling for Michigan’s wolves! https://www.change.org/petitions/urge-michigan-s-legislature-to-reject-hr-5834

Wolves In Wyoming Need Help

This is from a email I recieved today from Wild Earth Guardian. If wolves are too be hunted in Wyoming, you can bet that state as well as any other state that allows the killing of these animals will never get on penny from me or anyone else that I can get to not tour or live in these states. This is bullshit and the killing of Wolves must be stopped.

“Monday, September 10, 2012 Grassroots Conservation Organizations Notice Feds of Impending Wolf Litigation

Wyoming’s Wolves to be Shot En Masse Contact: Wendy Keefover (303) 573-4898 x 1162

Washington, D.C. A coalition of grassroots conservation groups filed a notice of intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for its decision to prematurely rescind Endangered Species Act protection for wolves in Wyoming. This “delisting” decision turns the fate of Wyoming’s wolves over to a hostile State government, which has already drawn up plans for a fall slaughter.

The Wyoming “wolf plan” calls for unregulated wolf killing in over 80 percent of the state. Many of Wyoming’s current population of approximately 330 wolves will die this winter. The State intends to allow a minimum of only 100 wolves to survive outside of Yellowstone National Park and the Wind River Reservation, but it has no way to know when it has reached that threshold because it is impossible to census wolf populations unless they wear radio collars.

“Wolves belong to all Americans, but powerful industry lobbyists and their political cronies don’t agree,” said Wendy Keefover of WildEarth Guardians. “The anti-wolf minority wants to kill as many wolves as possible before we can get to the courthouse, and the Fish and Wildlife Service is completely complicit in this terrible arrangement.”

Wyoming’s wolf plan was written in part to appease the cattle and sheep industry, which has loudly protested wolf predation on livestock. But their claims of innumerable livestock losses are without merit. Data show that wolves kill less than one percent of cattle and sheep inventories in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming.

Some sportsmen also complain that wolves kill too many elk; yet, the States of Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming each host elk populations that exceed management objectives. Wyoming’s elk population is 24 percent over its objective of 85,000 animals. The 2010 count reported 104,000 elk in the state.

“Wyoming’s wolf plan is one of appeasement, answering vociferous, but false claims about wolf predation on elk and livestock,” said Gary Macfarlane of Friends of the Clearwater.

Wolves did not evolve with hunting and trapping pressures and even low levels of killing by humans harm their populations.

“The full effects of hunting can’t be calculated, as it breaks up families of wolves,” said Priscilla Feral of Friends of Animals. “The death of parents always leaves the young to become disoriented and often abandoned to starve.”

“The future plans of millions of tourists who visit Wyoming for wolf watching will be affected, and this threatens ecotourism, one of the fastest growing industries in the region,” said David Hornoff of the National Wolfwatcher Coalition.

As top carnivores, the presence of wolves in ecosystems creates greater biological diversity, affecting species ranging from beetles to songbirds to grizzly bears.

“Wolves are a natural and important component in a fully-functioning ecosystem;” said Michael Garrity of Alliance for Wild Rockies, “without wolves, fragile stream habitats are impaired by overabundant elk and this negatively effects numerous species.”

“Wolf recovery is unfinished business until they are present in healthy numbers in all suitable habitats across the American West,” said Kenneth Cole of Western Watersheds Project.

Duane Short of Biodiversity Conservation Alliance said, “Wyoming’s wolf management ‘plan’ regresses to a past era when Wyoming’s valuable wolves were shot-on-sight as part of a deliberate extermination campaign.”

The conservation and animal advocacy groups agree that Wyoming’s wolf population has not been recovered and that it makes no sense—ecologically or economically—to subject even a fully recovered wolf population to a trigger-happy firing squad.

“The Wyoming plan is not good for wolves, for the environment, or millions of taxpayers that want to restore more wolves to the landscape,” said Denise Boggs of Conservation Congress.

WildEarth Guardians’ General Counsel, Jay Tutchton of Colorado, represents the groups.”